Fisherman surprised by 14ft shark casually swimming through British waters

A stunned fisherman managed to capture the moment a 14ft shark swam next to his boat off the UK coast.

Filming the astonishing moment on his smartphone, Alex Nel, tracked the beast as it headed towards his boat while in Welsh waters.

The dairy farmer can be heard exclaiming: "What the f**k is that?" Before adding: "It's a f*****g shark" in his video of the sighting.

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The 32-year-old was on a fishing trip off Strumble Head in Cardigan Bay, Pembrokeshire, which is known for its rich marine life, when he came across the shark on Saturday.

He claimed the shark was only a couple of feet shorter than the 16ft boat he was on.

Re-capping the incident online, he said: "Sorry about the language, I was a little surprised to see a basking shark just casually swimming across the surface of the sea."

Despite the scare, the shark is believed to be a harmless Basking Shark which feed off plankton and are found in UK waters throughout the summer.

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The Wildlife Trust describes the species as a "gentle giant" and says they can grow up to 12metres (36ft) in length.

Alex's sighting wasn't an isolated incident in Wales, only last month a dogwalker stumbled across a four-metre-long beast washed up on the Gower coast.

The humungous fish was later identified as an Atlantic bluefin tuna, an endangered species of the marine animal and the largest of its kind according to WWF (World Wide Fund for Nature).

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