Flood alerts MAPPED: Warning as EIGHT inches of rain to drench UK

UK weather: Snow and rain showers forecast by Met Office

Over the last week, the Met Office has issued several weather warnings for rain, ice and snow. The Environment Agency has issued more than 100 flood warnings and alerts for England today (Saturday, January 16). Here are the latest flood and weather warnings.

In England 103 flood alerts have been issued, meaning people should be prepared for possible flooding.

Additionally, 22 flood warnings have also been issued, which mean flooding is expected and immediate action is required.

A flood alert has also been issued by Natural Resources Wales for South Pembrokeshire.

For information on whether flooding alerts or warnings have been issued in your local area, check the Government website HERE. 

Flood warnings have been issued for the following areas in England, as of Saturday evening:

  • B1040 Thorney to Whittlesey Road to the South of the River Nene
  • Cogenhoe Mill Caravan Site
  • Low lying areas close to the River Great Ouse and River Ouzel at Newport Pagnell
  • Low lying properties in the Upper Hull catchment
  • North Bank Road alongside the River Nene, east of Peterborough and west of Dog-in-a-Doublet Sluice
  • River Cam at Stapleford, Great Shelford and Hauxton
  • River Derwent at Buttercrambe Mill
  • River Derwent at Stamford Bridge – The Weir Caravan Park and Kexby Bridge
  • River Glen at Surfleet Reservoir during high tide periods
  • River Ouse at Naburn Lock
  • River Ouse at York – riverside properties
  • River Ouzel at Bletchley and Caldecotte
  • River Ouzel at Simpson, Woolstone, Middleton and Willen
  • River Soar at caravan parks near Barrow upon Soar
  • River Soar at Zouch Island
  • River Thame from below Eythrope to Chiselhampton
  • River Trent at Cavendish Bridge
  • River Witham and associated Fens from Chapel Hill to Boston
  • River Witham and associated Fens from Woodhall Spa to Chapel Hill
  • River Wreake at Frisby-on-the-Wreake
  • River Wreake for mills at Hoby, Thrussington and Ratcliffe
  • The Mardyke from North Stifford to Purfleet

From next week some areas of the UK can expect to see some heavy rain, according to the Met Office.

Nick Silkstone, Met Office Deputy Chief Meteorologist, said: “During Monday and Tuesday we will see large rainfall totals across the high ground of western Britain.

“This rainfall combined with snowmelt will lead to a high volume of water moving through river catchments in these regions.”

The Met Office has issued yellow rain warnings for three days next week, starting from Monday.

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A yellow rain warning covers much of Wales and north-west England from Monday at 6pm until 6pm on Wednesday.

The warning affects cities including Swansea, Cardiff, Manchester, Sheffield and Carlisle.

The Met Office warns “heavy rainfall” in combination with “some snowmelt across the hills” may lead to flooding of roads and properties.

Up to 200mm of rainfall, or approximately eight inches, could fall over some regions under warning.

The Met Office rain warning reads: “A broad area of rainfall will arrive across this region later on Monday and remain across the area for the following 36-48 hours.

“Rainfall will be heaviest and most persistent across western facing hills.

“Over the course of this time, 30-60 mm of rainfall is expected to fall widely across the warning area, with the potential for up to 150-200 mm across the regions most exposed hills (most likely across northwest Wales, and northwest England).

“Across the higher Pennine Hills, there will likely still be significant snowfall laying on Monday.

“Much of this will melt during this event and may add an additional 5-10 mm quite widely, and as much as 20-30 mm across the highest snow-covered hills.

“Strong winds will also accompany the rainfall and may add to travelling difficulties across areas higher and more exposed routes.”

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