UK heatwave: Exact date Britain to swelter in 30C August blast as hosepipe ban looms –maps

UK weather: Warm and calm conditions forecast by Met Office

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Weather forecaster WXCharts has predicted highs of 30C in Essex and Surrey on Tuesday, August 2. Around London, temperatures will rise to 29C, while the north will see highs of 24C. Scotland will reach up to 19C.

Met Office spokesman Stephen Dixon suggested temperatures could rise above 30C.

He predicted “some above average temperatures in the south of the UK” in the first week of August.

Mr Dixon said it was possible the UK could experience anything “from the mid-20s to the low 30s” during that time.

Over the course of the next few days, conditions are set to be “pleasant”, with highs of 28C.

BBC forecaster Matt Taylor said: “We will see some sunny spells to take us through the day and a pretty warm day as well.”

“25C to 28C degrees expected for today.”

This comes as the country braces for a potential drought in August, following an extended period of dry weather.

Hosepipe bans for households could be brought in across the UK if the government implements a drought plan.

It follows months of below-average rainfall for much of the country, and unprecedented temperatures in July – reaching above 40C on Tuesday – putting heightened pressure on water supplies.

Maps from The Environment Agency (EA) show that river levels across the UK are either below normal, notably low or exceptionally low across the country, with only two locations ranked as “normal”.

Most of England has been moved into “prolonged dry weather” status – meaning the EA is now taking precautionary actions to mitigate impacts.

Martin Lines, chair of the Nature Friendly Farming Network, said: “This prolonged dry weather is having a serious impact on crops, especially spring planted crops that have had very little rain since planting.

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“Many farm reservoirs are getting low and we’re relying on a wet winter to refill them. We’re seeing a huge impact on the new hedges and trees farmers have planted in the past few years for climate mitigation.

“Increasing periods of drought also mean outdoor-reared livestock are struggling for grass and farmers are having to use this year’s cut of hay which is eating into their winter feed stocks.”

Minette Batters, the president of the National Farmers’ Union, said: “We don’t have time to waste.

“The situation with water is very, very serious for growers – there are implications for costs and crop viability.”

Ms Batters added: “We have taken our water supply for granted in this country for so long.

“We are not storing and moving water in the way that we should be.

“Water security and food security are inextricably linked and food security is incredibly important.

“We can’t see growers not having a viable crop.”

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